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The Architectural 3D Printing Revolution!

During his visit to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, The 3D Print Canal House was presented to United States’ President Barack Obama by the Mayor of Amsterdam Eberhard van der Laan.

http://3dprintcanalhouse.com
Image: During his visit to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, The 3D Print Canal House was presented to President Barack Obama by the Mayor of Amsterdam Eberhard van der Laan.http://3dprintcanalhouse.com
 
About 3D Printing

Believe it or not, 3D printing has been around since 1984 when inventor Chuck Hull built the world’s first working model. However, it took until the start of the 21st century for this technology to truly take off. Latest estimates from Wohlers Associates states that the market for 3D printing in 2012 was worth $2.2 Billion worldwide, which was a 29% increase from the year prior.

When compared to traditional machining techniques that rely on subtraction methods of removing material by cutting and drilling, 3D printing has an advantage of using an additive methods by printing virtually any shape. Although the most common materials used to print are thermoplastics, some printers can also print edible materials, rubber, clay, porcelain, titanium, aluminium, stainless steel, paper, and photopolymer. Currently, 3D printing is being implemented in industries  ranging from architecture & construction, aerospace & military, fashion, and more.

3D Print Canal House: Amsterdam (The Netherlands) | DUS Architects

For the past few weeks thousands of people in Amsterdam have been visiting the site of what is being called the “World’s First 3D Printed House”. Known as the 3D Printed Canal House, this site is an exhibition for 3D Printing Architecture. The innovative company behind this project is the Dutch firm DUS Architects. DUS Architects specializes in Public Architecture that consciously influences our daily life.

There is nothing conventional about the construction of this house! The entire design of this house is thoroughly modeled using state of the art computer software. Afterwards, each room assembly is printed on site separately, and put together like giant Lego pieces. The material being used for this house is a biological plastic containing 75% plant oil and reinforced with microfibers. The building assemblies are being printed in a honeycomb lattice shape that acts as a structural element, and is later filled with lightweight concrete for insulation and additional strength.

The most fascinating aspect of this type of construction is that the ornamentation, exterior facade, structure, and inner facade are all printed as one solid piece. This is definitely one of the most optimal forms of systems integration. In this wall assembly you will find construction connections, cables, pipes, wiring, and more. The result is a seamless and streamlined look.

Enjoy this video for more information on the 3D Print Canal House, and if you’re in the area anytime soon tickets are only €2,50!

The Future of 3D Printing

As costs of 3D printing are dropping every year the possibilities with this technology are endless. The goal for many of the 3D printer manufacturers is for each household to someday own a domestic 3D printer. This will enable the general public to 3D print common household items from an open source database. For example, if you run out of forks for a dinner party there is no need to drive to the store, because you can print your own in minutes. I am not sure when this will become a reality, but it sure is exciting to see projects like the house in Amsterdam being built.

What are your thoughts on the future of 3D printing? Send us your ideas in the comments below!

+ M. Farid Shahid

Sources: 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/mar/28/work-begins-on-the-worlds-first-3d-printed-house


http://3dprintcanalhouse.com/


http://www.dusarchitects.com/index.php
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